Official Guidelines: In addition to information covered in the Get Started videos. • The SMC utilizes a simple structural series of rules that must be followed by the collaborative artists, at the penalty of being personally removed from the project. o The SMC will aim to have its content appropriate for ages 16 and up. An example of these limitations (or freedoms) are embellished below. E – EVERYONE (all ages, may contain minimal violence) T – TEEN (12 and up, may contain mild violence or mild profanity) T+ – TEEN PLUS (16 and up, may contain moderate violence, moderate profanity use and suggestive themes ) M – MATURE (18 and up, may contain nudity, profanity, excessive violence and other content not suitable for minors) o If an artist’s panel contains anything that would fall under the adult category of 18+, a warning will be sent to the artist, and their panel will not be used, unless it is edited for a wider audience’s viewing. They will receive a warning email about this and have the opportunity to edit their panel and resubmit it in 24 hours. If they fail to do this a new artist is nominated. o No one can add content to the comic that they do not own the rights to, or will infringe upon any copyright unrelated to the SMC. If an artist attempts to add copyrighted material to the SMC either by accident or intentionally, they will receive a warning email about this and have the opportunity to edit their panel and resubmit it in 24 hours. If they fail to do this a new artist is nominated. • The newly nominated artist has a set amount of responsibilities that must be completed in 48 hours of them receiving their welcoming email. o The artist must review the information on the website either by video or text in order to become familiar with the project. o After reviewing the information, the artist must use the random number (1-6) sent to them in their email, and implement that particular transition into their panel. o The artist may use any media to create their panel, as long as it ends up in a two dimensional image that can be edited into the main document. o Once their panel is complete, the artist needs to watch the final video or read the last bit of instruction in order to complete the process.  The artist also has the option of including a headshot photo to be added to the collection of the artists on the website as well.  The artist may sign their name in their panel, but are encouraged not to do so, as it will be included in the online document instead, and their signature will only take away from their own art. • Non-artists are welcome, and even encouraged to add to the SMC no matter how amateur their work may appear. The reason for this is to keep the SMC open to as many people as possible. It should not be a place to make some artist look superior to other amateur ones, but by no means does this mean that artists don’t have the right to utilize their own talent. The point is to learn and spread connections and knowledge gained from the experience.  Text Versions of the Video Tutorials Hello everyone, and welcome to the Social Media Comic! Where people of all ages and abilities are welcome to draw the next panel for this ever changing online comic. Even participants who have never considered themselves to be artists are strongly encouraged to join in alongside professionals. The SMC has been traded from artist to artist ever since its first panel, constantly shifting the story and art style as the comic evolved. Right now, it continues to grow with new contributors every day. The way to create a panel is simple. Just submit your name to the website, and it’ll be added to the official list online. Artists are notified from this list to let them know it’s their turn to create their panel. (The link is in the description below) Whether you’re just signing up, or it’s your turn right now, let’s briefly go over the rules, so you can better prepare right away! Artistically, you can use any and all media to create your panel. You can doodle, paint, collage, even shoot photography! As long as your panel ends up as a 2D image, you can do whatever you like! Show off your own artistic skills, be creative, and be yourself. Keep in mind that your content should be appropriate for a wide audience. This means no nudity, profanity, excessive violence, or other offensive content. Also, remember that adding copyrighted characters, or other material to the SMC is prohibited. This comic is for everyone, so let’s be fair to everyone by avoiding exclusive content. Everyone also deserves a fair chance to participate, that’s why artists take turns in the order that they signed up online, to assure fresh new material. There will be a lot of artists participating, so to keep the ball rolling, artists will have a 48 hour period to create and submit their panels online. If an artist is unable to meet these requirements within 48 hours, their art won’t be accepted, and a new artist will take their place. Now to keep things interesting, let’s add a bit of a challenge to the mix. For those of you already nominated, you have also been assigned a random number between 1 and 6. This number is very important in determining what you can do with your panel. Each number 1 through 6, corresponds with a different type of panel to panel transition that you will have to implement when creating your panel. These transitions vary in intensity from very subtle changes in story, to absurdly unrelated material. Depending on your number, it might be your job to either carry the story along smoothly, or to try and disrupt it as much as possible. No matter how your creativity unfolds, you’ll be generating an incredible chain reaction of subsequent panels that will result from what you create. Ready to get started? Great! To get your name added to the list, check the link below for details. For those of you already nominated, click your assigned number to jump to the next video and learn about what you can do with your panel transition! While awaiting your turn, follow us on facebook for up to date panel submissions and SMC related news. Panel Transition #1: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 1. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the first panel to panel transition, represents a change of moment to moment. This means that between the last panel to yours, almost nothing visually happens. You can subtly zoom in or out, show a minute movement, or any other event that would happen just a single moment later. Now just because that sounds like your panel doesn’t have personality to it doesn’t mean you can’t add any. I said nothing about what kind of text you can or can’t add in narration boxes, or dialogue that characters may say during your temporary pause in action. Utilize this moment to make the story evolve in the direction you’d like to see. What would the characters say in this situation? What narration could we hear while we examine the last frame with a subtle change? What small movement now could have an incredible meaning in the future? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, why not utilize your moment to moment transition to redraw it as an amazingly elaborate recreation? Either way, the readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, with just- one- moment? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya Panel Transition #2: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 2. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the second panel to panel transition, represents a change of action to action. This means that between the last panel to yours, some visible action happens! Without moving the point of view from the last panel, what kind of action do you see happening in the next panel? Keep in mind that I said nothing about what kind of text you can or can’t add in narration boxes, or dialogue that characters may say during your action panel. Utilize this action to make the story evolve in the direction you’d like to see. How might the characters react after this event? What kind of event, silly or serious, would you like to see happen next? What will this action mean for the outcome of the comic? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, don’t feel limited to creating simple art, utilize your best skills to turn that image into an incredible action to the best of your ability. The readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, with a single action? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya Panel Transition #3: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 3. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the third panel to panel transition, represents a change of subject to subject. This means that between the last panel to yours, the scene continues from another point of view! With the ability to choose your own camera angle, visually focus on another part of the scene, while continuing the main story. Jump from one character to another, or focus on another action happening at the same time. Another way to look at it, is to imagine your panel, and the last one as existing alone. They shouldn’t visually look at all the same, or even relevant out of context, but because people understand comics by the sequence as a whole, the reader will put together the fact that your new panel is a direct event happening after the last one, even if it is in a different place. Keep in mind that I said nothing about what kind of text you can or can’t add in narration boxes, or dialogue that characters may say during your panel. Utilize this jump to make the story evolve in the direction you’d like to see. How can you continue the story without showing any characters or events the last panel? What else is going on in this scene that would help add to the whole if it were showcased? How can you use this event to change the course of the comic? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, don’t feel limited to creating simple art, utilize your best skills create your own transition to the best of your ability. The readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, after jumping to a new subject? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya Panel Transition #4: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 4. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the fourth panel to panel transition, represents a change of scene to scene. This means that between the last panel to yours, the scene completely changes! No matter where the last panel left off, it’s time to jump to a new time or place! Now you can take the story wherever you like, and direct our attention to the next scene. Just like how a movie will cut to a new scene, your panel needs to find a way to do the same. Keep in mind that I said nothing about what kind of text you can or can’t add in narration boxes, or dialogue that characters may say during your panel. Utilize this scene change to make the story evolve in the direction you’d like to see. It’s important to note that a scene to scene transition can get the comic back on track again, after a seemingly irrelevant panel gets thrown into the mix. Can you use your scene transition to make sense of a completely random panel? Where will the characters be in an hour? A week? Or maybe a year? Where can you transport the audience to change the course of the comic? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, don’t feel limited to creating simple art, utilize your best skills create your scene change to the best of your ability. The readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, after jumping to a new scene? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya Panel Transition #5: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 5. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the fifth panel to panel transition, represents a change of aspect to aspect. This means that between the last panel to yours, the imagery completely changes, while still depicting a common theme or idea. This is a tricky transition to understand, so let’s try and clarify this before moving on. If the last panel relates to a theme that can be visually depicted like sports for example, then a transition of aspect to aspect could mean that the next panel shows us an image of a referee, or a cheerleader. These images would relate to the last panel in terms of content, but NOT in terms of story! Focus on making a panel that shows an idea that is expressed in the last panel. This could be referencing something said by a character, or referencing the actual scene itself. If the story in the last panel takes place on an island, you could create an image of a sandcastle, or a bottle floating in the sea. Just focus on the idea, and try to forget about the story! That is unless you have a good idea about how your panel could be important for someone else down the line. If you’re concerned about not evolving the story of the comic during your panel, why not add a narration box into your panel allowing a character from a past panel to speak in yours. This would be similar to how a movie can show us a different scene or view, while we keep hearing the characters communicate, or narrate. Utilize this abrupt change to make the story slow down and focus on the ideas being presented. Though challenging, there are a lot of very clever ways to use this transition to your benefit! It’s important to note that an aspect to aspect transition help can get the comic back on track again, after a seemingly irrelevant panel has been thrown into the mix. Can you use your scene transition to make sense of a completely random past panel? What aspects of this scene are interesting, shocking, or funny to you? Is there some way to use this transition without accidentally throwing the comic completely off course? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, don’t feel limited to creating simple art, utilize your best skills create your panel change to the best of your ability. The readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, after jumping to a new aspect? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya Panel Transition #6: Social Media Comic Before creating your panel for the Social Media Comic, you’ll need to utilize the random number given to you in order to fulfill your challenge. For this video, let’s talk about what it means to have the number 6. Each of these random numbers 1 through 6 represent different degrees of panel to panel transitions. 1, being the most subtle of these changes, and 6 being the most extreme. The 6 transition numbers used in the SMC directly reference the 6 degrees of panel to panel transitions Scott McCloud discusses in his graphic novel Understanding Comics. In which he discussed that the sixth panel to panel transition, represents a non-sequitur. This means that between the last panel to yours, there is absolutely NO relation to the story in terms of imagery and text. This may come as a shock to you, but that’s the point! Your job is to do your best to completely throw off the comic entirely! Forget the story completely, in fact totally ignore it! It’ll be the next artist’s job of figuring out how to make sense of your crazy off-the-wall panel. Don’t worry about them! You have the power to make the most abrupt change in the comic and do practically whatever you like. Utilize this spontaneous change to make the story completely derail into whatever you want! The following panels may end up using your random panel in a way you never anticipated! Does the panel you have in mind relate in any aspect to the story beforehand? Don’t let it! Is there some way the following panel might try to make sense of your panel? How far away can you possibly launch the story away from what was just happening? It’s all up to you. Also, don’t feel intimidated or persuaded to illustrate your panel in a particular way, especially if you are new to drawing. Just because the person behind you made an incredible digital painting, doesn’t mean that you have to follow it up by mimicking their style. If the panel before you is as simple as a stick figure, don’t feel limited to creating simple art, utilize your best skills create your panel change to the best of your ability. The readers will understand the transition you’re making no matter the art style. How do you see the comic unfolding, after complete non-sequitur? For more information about this panel transition, check out Scott McCloud’s work in the links below. Once you’ve finished your panel, head on over to the final video by clicking the annotation here! Or, save it for later with the link in the description. That’s all for now! Good luck on your panel! See-ya After Finishing Your Panel: Social Media Comic Alright- You’ve finished your panel! Now there are just a few quick things that need to be done to get your panel properly submitted so the next artist can begin. First, scan your work and make sure your panel is saved as a jpeg, pdf, or png so it can be added to the comic online, and easily shared with the rest of the participants. Next, head over to the submission page on the SMC website and upload your file. You might’ve also noticed the collection of profile pictures on the website showing the group of collaborators. If you’d like to add your own profile picture to the mix, attach it when you submit your panel. It’s best to send a close up facial shot so you can be recognized even as a small thumbnail. Once everything checks out, your panel should appear on the website within a few hours. Your name will also be added to the list of collaborators alongside your panel and transition numbers. This is also where you’ll find your profile picture if you chose to add one. Now with your panel officially displayed on the website and facebook page, it’s up to you to nominate three friends to add their names to the list on the main site. Just send them a nomination email providing them the links they’ll need to get started. Those recommended links can be copied from the description below. Want to do another panel already? Great! You can re-add your name to the list online after you see at least one of your nominated friends’ names added to the list first. Gotta be fair to everyone you know? And with that all out of the way- you did it! Thank you for your contribution to the Social Media Comic! Stay in touch with the comic as it evolves on the main website and on Facebook. Thanks again for your participation, and remember to nominate 3 friends to keep the SMC active and strong! See ya!